Licensed firearms user, Laurie White, is in favour of the National Firearms Amnesty

SAFETY FIRST: Laurie White believes the three month national firearms amnesty is a worthwhile initiative. Photo: Heidi Gibson

SAFETY FIRST: Laurie White believes the three month national firearms amnesty is a worthwhile initiative. Photo: Heidi Gibson

In favour of the National Firearms Amnesty is Inverell local, Laurie White. 

"If it gets illegal firearms off the street that's a good thing," the Three Rivers Big Game Hunting treasurer and RSM Civilian Rifle Club vice captain said.

Mr White said it is possible for some firearms to get left behind and forgotten or to be left with a person as an heirloom.  

But whatever the reason, he believes owners should follow the regulations. 

"If they want to keep a prized firearm like an heirloom they should go through process of getting a license and register it. Otherwise they should give it up and surrender it."

Mr White said a wide range of people make up the farming and sporting sectors where most local firearm owners are based. 

Each one must meet a detailed and lengthy process to be deemed a 'fit and proper' person to be granted a license and then a permit to acquire a firearm. Those who qualify must also install a special safe storage facility to house the item, and be listed on a government database. 

"A lot of people think you can just go into a firearms shop and buy one off the shelf," he said. 

"But there is a lot in it and people don't realise." 

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