Inverell High School class create small businesses

Real-world challenge: The year 10 students are already selling products and learning how to deal with customers as business professionals.
Real-world challenge: The year 10 students are already selling products and learning how to deal with customers as business professionals.

A class of high school students have become small business owners as part of a unique assignment designed to challenge them with real-world risks and rewards.

From key chains to pamper packs, Inverell High School’s year 10 Horizons class are designing, creating and selling their own products – with their marks based on profit. 

“I really like being the manager of a business and being the one that’s in control of everything with all the ideas,” Paige Beveridge said.  Making polymer clay key chains and earrings, she already has several orders through her Facebook and Instagram pages. 

Paige said she had always admired similar jewellery and that the project inspired her to create her own pieces. 

“I really liked learning how to do it and making them and everything,” she said.

Jessica Coote’s big challenge was finding a market for her relaxation pamper packs without having access to Facebook. Filled with candles, bath salts, bath bombs, a mug with herbal teas, chocolates and information booklets on yoga and relaxation techniques; Jessica targeted female dominated workplaces.

She has already begun distributing her products to customers.

“It’s good to be creative and design something and sell it and involve other people,” Jessica said.

Creating an activity pack to keep children occupied during their parents’ coffee stops, Amber Lavender said she had to consider product safety and profit margins.

Disappointed to see so many young children glued to phones, the young waitress was inspired to give parents another option. She filled bags with stamps, crayons, Play-Doh, a notebook and colouring in book – keen to give customers value for their money while maintaining a reasonable profit. Despite their popularity, fidget spinners were eliminated from the Peaceful Possum Activity Packs due to their status as potential choking hazards.

“It’s real life, it’s real experiences, which is so much more than a mark on a page,” teacher Cath Jeffery said.

She admitted the difficult assignment was very unpopular at first, but was pleased to see the group rise to the challenge. The class will sell their wares in a pop-up shop on September 2.